Heard about ProfitHacks? This is Why I DON’T Want You to Buy It

ProfitHacksThere’s a big launch going on in case you haven’t noticed yet … a thingy called ProfitHacks.

“Hacks” … sounds cool, doesn’t it? Everybody likes to get in on some hacks to {something}, especially profits.

And everybody, I really do mean EVERYBODY is promoting this right now. There are tens of webinars, insane numbers of bonuses, and who knows what else.

Now, let me say this upfront: I don’t intend to promote ProfitHacks, and you won’t find my affiliate link at the end. This isn’t any sort of fake affiliate review or disguised marketing message.

Why am I writing this post, then? It’s simple. Where everyone says that you should absolutely buy this, I feel the need to say the opposite.

Don’t buy this!

Unless you have $997 to spare just like that. In such a case, your call. But if you really like to get your money’s worth of value out of the things you buy then think twice before taking the step…

Here’s why:

What is ProfitHacks

A course on how to outsource your work strategically.

… scratch that …

Not how to outsource your work. More like how to outsource content creation and distribution. Which in my dictionary is not even close to the definition of “running a business.”

Actually, there’s nothing wrong with outsourcing content creation and distribution. However, the way this launch is marketed does not make it possible for the product to deliver on the promise…

I’m sorry, but that’s just the case. Let’s take a look at what’s going on:

The art of product launch

I love product launches. I’m actually on most IM lists out there. I don’t know why, but I like to pay attention to what’s going on, and to learn stuff by observing what marketers do, as opposed to what they say.

Here’s how the content for this launch got distributed.

First, there was the report called “The Profit Prophesy” – nice title, and I really do mean it. It’s a great title, almost irresistible.

However, the report provides hardly any useful information whatsoever. The first half talks about how great Rich Schefren is, and the second half talks about how crappy other marketers are (including you).

Then there were videos. And again, very little information there too. I mean, the videos balance on the verge of giving some info, but then (suddenly) they are straight back to marketing talk.

Rich talks about various things that don’t work and blames it on the “mind virus,” but he doesn’t say anything on how to do them right. So you’re left with a feeling that “damn, I suck,” as opposed to “damn, I’ve learned a lot.” Which was probably the goal of this whole thing because it literally makes you itch to see the next part.

This next part kind of seems like it provides some valuable info, but as it turns out … it doesn’t. And I had to watch the video twice to understand why.

The thing is that the video instructs you to ask yourself a range of questions, and if your answer to any of them is no then you are in trouble.

The questions are highly-business related, and they are actually very well thought-through. Like:

  • Do you believe you currently have the right balance between what you’re learning on the one hand and what you’re earning on the other?
  • At the end of your day, are you happy with what you’ve accomplished and the outcome that those accomplishments will generate for you?
  • Are you sure you know which marketing tactics right now are most important for you and your business to grow?
  • Have you had the experience of a single piece of content causing a significant amount of traffic, sales, and profits?
  • Are you satisfied with the results that you’re getting when compared to the effort that you’re currently putting in?
  • Do you currently have a strong presence spread throughout the internet, all the different social media platforms, the video platforms, organic search results, and forums in your niche?
  • Have you figured out the fastest and easiest route to take you to your online goals and objectives?
  • and a handful more…

These questions actually are very important to ask yourself. You can see the full list by going to the sales page and locating the “Phase 3: The Root Causes” video.

But.

The only problem is that the questions are designed to give you at least a couple of no answers. I guarantee that there’s no human being in the world able to complete this with all yeses. So no matter how great you are, after watching that video you will be left with an impression that you’re doing something wrong. Yet another reason for watching the next one, by the way…

(Side note. In my opinion, there’s nothing bad about not knowing an answer to some of those questions. This is the whole beauty of running a business and figuring stuff out along the way. Anyways, back to the topic…)

The videos then go on to explain that the problems you’ve just discovered (by answering questions) are not character flaws (probably because it’d be hard to bill you for fixing them), and that the “mind virus” can be cured.

In the end, the message promises to teach you how to create a “hands-off online business.”

In a word: great. This truly is a very nicely done marketing message, and if you just had the product to deliver on such a promise then great, I’d be happy to be able to promote something like this.

The only problem is that ProfitHacks doesn’t seem like that product…

business

What an online business is

For me, running an actual business is not about crafting some content in a hurry, repurposing it multiple times, and then spreading it everywhere you can (and outsourcing everything heavily along the way).

Something that’s common among every massively successful business is that their owners were not looking for a quick fix, a hack or a trick to build their empire. They were about producing great products (real products, by the way, not just an e-book with a $1000 price tag) and being involved in every stage of the process in person.

If you just want to lay on the beach while other people do your stuff then better buy a lottery ticket. Business is not for you.

And I’m not saying that the product is certainly no good. Well, I haven’t used it personally, so I can’t know for sure. However, whenever someone is talking about “those bad gurus” selling push-button solutions, and then pitches their own product saying that it’s basically a push-button solution then something is not right…

Nay nay

So, just to summarize this. If you have $997 to spare (again, that’s a $1000 (!)), go ahead and buy it. Tell me what your experience is, and I’ll gladly update this post afterwards. If you do, however, value your hard-earned dollar then invest in something else.

In the meantime, do some research online and you’ll find an extraordinary amount of information on how to outsource various business tasks.

And to end this on a high note, in the final video they’re saying something about their product teaching an “idiot-proof” way of doing {something} (I can’t remember exactly). And this is the thing I have big problems with. I don’t know how about you, but if someone tries to sell me an “idiot-proof” method to achieve something, I find it a bit insulting.

I’m not searching for an idiot-proof way … let’s leave idiot-proof ways for idiots, and in the meantime, let’s focus on the right way.


  • http://www.thesmallbusinessideassite.com/ daveM

    I really like the style of this post…. in your face writing…
    In my own brief experience, many people are blasting out inferior content and charging ridiculous prices for what can be found in individual blogs and on article directories. There is so much material that is almost fraudulent marketing. No wonder the public is shying away from internet marketers.
    Thanks for the insights.